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Author Topic: Guidelines for creating new competitions  (Read 16749 times)

QuafaS

Guidelines for creating new competitions
« on: April 02, 2006, 10:24:22 pm »
So, since here isn't any specific rules for a tournament or any tips how to make a succesfull tournament/competition, I decided to copy/paste Zapp's guidelines from GU since not everyone are registered/active in the GU.
_____

Guidelines for creating new competitions

This guide is meant to be read before the creation of new competitions. So if you want to create a new competition, make sure you carefully read this through. It will hopefully save you alot of time and trouble by giving some advice at what works and what doesn't, and to help you avoid mistakes that have already been made by several tournament hosts.

Competitions can be divided into two types:

    * Creative competitions (where competitors create something like skins, levels or mods)
    * Gaming competitions (tournaments where players compete in various aspects of the LieroX game)

The fact is that LieroX competitions fail far more often than they succeed. Success means that the competition took place, a winner was chosen according to the rules from a number of competitors. Failure means that this didn't happen. The following statistics are from competitions that have been held during from 29.3 2005 to 15.3.2006. Out of the 15 creative competitions 52% failed. Out of the 39 gaming competitions 80% failed. Sometimes the hosts of the competitions had put alot of work into the competition such as creating a website for the competition, only to have the whole thing fall apart.

Creative competitions

Creative competitions are usually based around people voting on the best creative piece, such as voting on a best level. They are difficult to complete, since there are very few people that are interested in working hard in creating something for a particular competition.

Reasons why creative competitions fail:

    * The subject isn't interesting
    * The subject is too complex, difficult, or worksome
    * Host stops updating the thread and the competition dies off.

Reasons why creative competitions succeed:


    * The subject is interesting and intriguing
    * There is enough time to make contributions
    * The host is active from the beginning to the end and tries to motivate the participants to finish the work
    * The judging is fair

Examples of successful creative competitions are Minimod Contest and Liero Art Competition.

Gaming competitions

Gaming competitions are the most popular type of competition, but yet 4 out of 5 competitions fail. Many tournament hosts and players have been very disappointed when the tourney didn't work out, something which could have been prevented.

Reasons why gaming competitions fail:

    * The competition itself is not interesting, eg. LX's Formula 1 Championship. People simply don't want to participate in something which isn't interesting.
    * The tournament is too complex. Complicated tournaments with alot of rules are prone to failure because they take too much effort to compete in. Players will rarely sign up for such tournaments, and it will be very difficult to keep it going because of the complexity. Example: LieroX Nations.
    * The tournament host is considered unreliable. This means that people won't participate in the tournament because the tournament host is not considered a reliable host, either due to them being new in the community, or that they have a history of not actively trying to finish their competitions.
    * The tournament host is inactive. This immediately causes the tournament to fail. A competition without a host is the same as no competition at all.
    * The tournament is too big. Many tournament hosts have grand thoughts about a great tournament with many players, such as a 32 player elimination format. For most hosts, this is simply too much to cope with. Many of the players play at different times, and some that have signed up that rarely even play LX. So the tournament stagnates after none or only a few games have been played. Another factor is that the tournament contains teams. Out of all the examined tournaments, there were no fully successful tournaments with team games. Teams make it much more difficult since many specific players need to be online at the same time.
    * The host belives that players will show up when told or at a time agreed upon. This is a very common mistake. Players will usually NEVER show up at a specific time. People have lives, and it's not like they are going to put a LX tournament into their calendar. Many say they will show up, but most forget about it. An example of a tournament which failed in this way is the Toilet Warriors Farewell Tournament.
    * The host believes that players will keep deadlines. Players will sometimes keep deadlines, especially if they are otherwise eliminated. But generally, similarly to showing up at a specific time, people won't keep deadlines that you set, unless you continuously remind them of the deadlines. Example: World Liero Championship II.

Reasons why some gaming competitions succeed:

    * The competition is interesting. Typically an elimination tournament or an all-vs-all format in popular mods will attract players.
    * The competition is small enough to be managable. This can be anything from eg. 4 to 16 players. Eight players is a quite easily managable number, and also allows for reasonable amounts of competition.
    * The host keeps in touch with all the players. This usually means being in the server at the same time, and using MSN (or possibly IRC) to keep in touch.
    * The host actively leads the competition, and makes decisions regarding it. This means making difficult decisions about kicking players that aren't active enough, and also making decisions about the breaking of the rules.
    * The competition is well-organized. This means that all of the mistakes listed above in the "Reasons why gaming competitions fail" are avoided, and that the structure and ruleset of the competition is a working combination.

List of fully successful tournaments:


    * All Night Round 2005
    * Eight Worm Weekend Beatdown
    * Firebird (3rd tournament)
    * King of the Spring 2005
    * MiLeC's Fightbox
    * Monday Massacre

List of tournaments with limited success:

    * [LoL]Open to All (Only four games)
    * Sheep Wars(prematurely ended)

The other 31 tournaments that have been hosted from 29.3 2005 to 15.3.2006, have failed.


General advice if you want to host a gaming competition

    * Most importantly, learn from the competitions above that have been successes. It is considered inappropriate to imitate a competition which is in progress; but there is nothing wrong with imitating a competition format which is over (other than blatantly copying the whole tournament). Do however try to be as original as possible. If you want to host a tournament which is the same or very similar to a previous one; you should ask the previous host for permission. You'll probably then be able to host it under the same name, separating it by adding a number to the end such as King of the Spring 2006 or Monday Massacre 2.
    * Make sure you've got enough time to be active and to finish the competition. There is nothing more aggravating for players than a competition host who is inactive or dissappears entirely.
    * Plan the competition well. This doesn't mean that you should make a minute-schedule (which won't work), but rather that you should consider things like "what if someone doesn't show up?" and "what if someone times out during the game?". A competition involving team games is not recommended (although possible), because it is very difficult to manage. Out of the 39 examined competitions, no team competitions were fully successful.
    * Make decisions. Sometimes you'll have to eliminate someone from the competition because they are inactive or broke the rules. Don't be afraid to make such decisions.
    * Be flexible. Sometimes you'll have to be flexible in deadlines and even rules to make things work rather than eliminating all the players in the tourney. It is better that it works than that the whole tourney crashes.
    * Try to keep few and only known players in the tourney. Unknown players or players that rarely play are very likely to disrupt the flow of the competition by not participating when they should. There is nothing wrong with picking the participants in an invited-only type tournament. The less players in the tourney, the more likely it is to succeed, although less than four players can hardly be considered a tournament. 6-8 players is a good start depending on the type of competition.
    * Keep in touch with the players. This means using MSN or some other form of direct communication so that you are able to lead the competition. Since players often won't show up, it is good to have replacement players in MSN that can participate instead. In elimination tournaments, it is crucial that the host reminds the players to play their games, and sees to it that they play them.
    * Keep the competition thread updated. A good way is to keep all the results and current events listed in the first post in the thread by editing it. Players can then find the current information easily, and be ensured that the competition is alive and well.
    * And finally: KEEP IT SIMPLE. A complicated or large competition will be very difficult to manage; players won't know the rules well enough and it will turn into a mess; or sometimes players won't participate at all because it is so complicated. A simple competition with simple rules and a simple structure will work much better. Especially if it is your first time hosting a competition.

A successful tournament is often alot of fun for both the players and the host. If you host a successful tournament, it is much more likely to work even better the next time, since you'll have more experience and players learn to trust you. With this guide you can hopefully avoid making the mistakes that have already been made over and over again, and perhaps add your tournament to the list of successful ones!
« Last Edit: April 02, 2006, 10:31:35 pm by QuafaS »
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Better than the rest!

Nico

Re: Guidelines for creating new competitions
« Reply #1 on: April 02, 2006, 11:31:23 pm »
Seems reasonable to me.
But just one thing.
It's to think it is easy when u have read this "guide"
But it still doesnt help so much.
This is more like a, "we already know all this" guide.
But well anyway well written and stuff.
But dont see it to help to much (for me) x)
But maybe for others.
Anyway, well nicley written "guide".
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QuafaS

Re: Guidelines for creating new competitions
« Reply #2 on: April 03, 2006, 07:51:44 am »
Quote
This is more like a, "we already know all this" guide.
But well anyway well written and stuff.
Why doesn't people make proper tournaments then?
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~ Q

We're the biggest,
The Best!
Better than the rest!

Cloud

Re: Guidelines for creating new competitions
« Reply #3 on: April 03, 2006, 08:21:12 pm »
Who says they don't? If a person that is new or not so much respected in the community, and they want to make a tournament, people who are veterans or respected members of the community won't even consider joining or flame them of even trying to host a tournament. It maybe could of been successful if enough active players joined it, but noone does.

QuafaS

Re: Guidelines for creating new competitions
« Reply #4 on: April 03, 2006, 08:35:51 pm »
Who says they don't? If a person that is new or not so much respected in the community, and they want to make a tournament, people who are veterans or respected members of the community won't even consider joining or flame them of even trying to host a tournament. It maybe could of been successful if enough active players joined it, but noone does.
If the tournament idea is good and it is organized well, whoever the host is, people will join it. Atleast I would.

Quote
Who says they don't?
"The other 31 tournaments that have been hosted from 29.3 2005 to 15.3.2006, have failed."
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~ Q

We're the biggest,
The Best!
Better than the rest!

Nico

Re: Guidelines for creating new competitions
« Reply #5 on: April 03, 2006, 08:47:51 pm »
Why doesn't people make proper tournaments then?


Well, as Cloud said.
If its a respected veteran then ppl join the tournament.
And if it's some beginner and noob (etc myself)
No one will join it, no mather how good organised or whatever it is.
(Ok, maybe the ones who are in my league etc noobs lol)
But..I didnt say it wasnt good, it is butif u would see it from my or other newbies eyes u would understand ;)
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Taliban

Re: Guidelines for creating new competitions
« Reply #6 on: April 03, 2006, 08:50:58 pm »
I think that it is hard to have any tournament now with the master server down, but, I think tournaments fail because it is the same thing over and over, and the mood the people are in. Sometimes people will want a tournament, sometines not. It all depends on the time.
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QuafaS

Re: Guidelines for creating new competitions
« Reply #7 on: April 03, 2006, 10:44:42 pm »
Quote
No one will join it, no mather how good organised or whatever it is.
I just said I would join it. And I'm sure many others would too.

Quote
If its a respected veteran then ppl join the tournament.
People joining the tournament is not the problem, the problem(s) start after they've joined the tournament (and of course if the tourny is not well organized). People start not to care about the competition and about the timelines, few games are delayed which leads to that the whole tourny is delayed and other people loose their interest even more.

Taliban, usually the tournaments fail because of the way the host has organized it and because of the way people regards to the competition, not because people are not in a mood or something. As listed in the first post, these are the main reasons why competitions fail:

    * The competition itself is not interesting, eg. LX's Formula 1 Championship.
    * The tournament is too complex.
    * The tournament host is considered unreliable.
    * The tournament host is inactive. This immediately causes the tournament to fail.
    * The tournament is too big.
    * The host belives that players will show up when told or at a time agreed upon.
    * The host believes that players will keep deadlines.
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We're the biggest,
The Best!
Better than the rest!

Nico

Re: Guidelines for creating new competitions
« Reply #8 on: April 04, 2006, 12:14:59 am »
U have some right there BUT, still its harder for none respected newbies to get tourneys work no mather how well organised it is.
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AnubisBlessing

Re: Guidelines for creating new competitions
« Reply #9 on: April 09, 2006, 11:10:32 am »
I think that it is hard to have any tournament now with the master server down

I don't see how that is a problem. If you know who is going to play and can give them your IP or add the new master server it's perfectly easy to play the tournament. MSN, forums and the chat here can be used for planning and organizing the games.
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QuafaS

Re: Guidelines for creating new competitions
« Reply #10 on: April 09, 2006, 01:34:23 pm »
U have some right there BUT, still its harder for none respected newbies to get tourneys work no mather how well organised it is.
I havn't seen that happening, can you give me an example?
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~ Q

We're the biggest,
The Best!
Better than the rest!

Nico

Re: Guidelines for creating new competitions
« Reply #11 on: April 09, 2006, 01:54:00 pm »
Sure if i would do one now on GU.
No one would be interested right?
No mather of how well organised it would be.
Well, i will do a tournament when the servers are working again.
And u will see what i mean.
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RuNyoufool

Re: Guidelines for creating new competitions
« Reply #12 on: April 09, 2006, 09:16:13 pm »
Sure if i would do one now on GU.
No one would be interested right?
No mather of how well organised it would be.
Well, i will do a tournament when the servers are working again.
And u will see what i mean.

It's smart to seek for opionions about your tourney before starting it. People that can give input will probably join too. If some join, others will too, etc. That's how it works, even for newer people
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Quake

Re: Guidelines for creating new competitions
« Reply #13 on: April 09, 2006, 11:27:39 pm »
That's most likely the reason he is postign on this thread. Like QuafuS said above, if their is a player in it that everyone knows, then more will want to join. That's how it is. After reading this thread I'm sure Nico should have a good background/layout on how to make a tournament. If not, you can just try talking with Q.

Quote from: Nico
Well, i will do a tournament when the servers are working again.
And u will see what i mean.

Yes. I understand what you mean. Not many people have the TL server right now so there wouldn;t be that many people being able to play in it right now. It would be hard to organize the games. If the GU server comes up any time soon or gets fixed, then people will be able to see it. Everyone for that matter, even the people without the TL server. It will probably be a little bit until the GU master server get's fixed. Jason probably has a few things he has to do and is busy. So by the time that is all blown off, a few tournaments will be over and more people will probably join then, as opposed to now where there is quite a few taking place. Anywho. Good luck to it whenever you bring it out. I may join it myself.
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RuNyoufool

Re: Guidelines for creating new competitions
« Reply #14 on: April 10, 2006, 02:02:13 am »
The GU masterserver for 0.56 will probably not come up again.

I don't see the reason that organizing tournaments will be harder without a masterserver. When playing tournament matches you want to do that thru ip anyways, so you can play without registereing the server. All people that signup for tournaments are forum members already usually, and those people are still around.
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Quake

Re: Guidelines for creating new competitions
« Reply #15 on: April 10, 2006, 04:12:15 am »
That all depends on the type of match. If its a tourny like fightbox, then yes. If its a tourny were there are scheduled matches then no.
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Re: Guidelines for creating new competitions
« Reply #16 on: June 02, 2006, 06:17:17 am »
King of winter tourny and other Liero world series also worked out and LX duel tournament.

QuafaS

Re: Guidelines for creating new competitions
« Reply #17 on: June 02, 2006, 11:21:10 am »
That all depends on the type of match. If its a tourny like fightbox, then yes. If its a tourny were there are scheduled matches then no.
If you'd make a tournament like FightBox, it most likely wouldn't get popular (atleast within the "best" players) because it would be kinda a rip-off. One of the reasons to make the tournament a success is to make it original (including proper and well explaned rules of course).
If one tournament becomes more popular than ones held before that, creating something similar will not guarantee it would work out aswell.
FightBox was a succeed (and still is) because nothing like that were never had before. Also MiLeC's (and other's) dedication towards the tournament made it work even better. What I see happening alot is that the host of the tournament gives up too easily if there is a period of inactivity within the players (though FB's schedule is different than usual tournament's). But again, the schedule of FightBox is also one of the reasons what made it so popular.

"If its a tourny were there are scheduled matches then no."
This is totally bullshit. The host determines the rules and makes the base for the tournament (schedules, rules, possible teams (pairs, clans..) etc.). But the rest is pretty much in the hands of the players who has signed in for the tournament. Of course the host of the tournament has to make sure the games are played but only when the players havn't played those when told. When a player or team decides to sign in for a tournament, they make an agreement where they will play the games that are scheduled and follow the rules that has been specified. I know there can come some things up in real life which can prevent your games to be played in time, but before you rush into things and sign yourself up for a tournament you first must know that you have time to play and be aware the time differenced between the opponent(s) (and host). I don't say it would be forbidden for Americans or Canadians to join tournaments where most people are from Europe but they have to realize it's quite frustrating to hear they can't play when they should due time difference. If you can't play the game(s) when you should, you shouldn't sign up for the whole tournament.

So, the host of the tournament determines the rules, sets up schedules and opponents etc. When that is done, the players must make sure they can follow the given rules and schedules because it's useless to lame host if everything he has done to make up the tournament are reasonable and clear. The success of a tournament is not only based on the host or the genre and type of the tournament but on the players and how they manage to do what they have agreed to follow.

If I'd make a tournament (schedule based) I probably would probably sift out the players from the appliers who sign in for the tournament based on how I see they have followed the rules and schedules in the previous tournaments they have been.
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We're the biggest,
The Best!
Better than the rest!

Legend

Re: Guidelines for creating new competitions
« Reply #18 on: November 09, 2006, 02:37:13 pm »
I haven't heard any comment about aC-Champions League, but in my opinion, it managed pretty successfully. The Group Stage's idea wasn't bad at all, and top of that its kinda unique so far.

« Last Edit: January 03, 2008, 01:00:47 pm by Legend »
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Tafka

Re: Guidelines for creating new competitions
« Reply #19 on: September 01, 2007, 10:33:33 am »
Hello. Sorry for posting this here, but:
Could someone make a good clan's tournament? I really like big clans tournaments. They simply rock :P

Example: Liero World Series
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